Running head: MODULE 3 COURSE PROJECT 1

MODULE 3 COURSE PROJECT 2

Module 3 Course Project

Name

Academic Institution

April 27, 2019

Module 3 Course Project

Title: India’s Health Delivery System

Thesis: India’s constitution upholds the issue of the ‘right to life’. As such, it necessitates the government to make sure that every citizen. However, this fundamental right remains unattainable to the poor pollution in the country

I. The health sector of India is defined by its federal organization as well as the allotment of the federal and state roles and financing responsibilities. India’s constitution upholds the issue of the ‘right to life’. As such, it necessitates the government to make sure that every citizen enjoys their right to life. However, this fundamental right remains unattainable to the poor pollution in the country

A. India’s constitution upholds the issue of the ‘right to life’. As such, it necessitates the government to make sure that every citizen.

B. The central government of India takes up the role of international health agreements, medical education, deterring food adulteration, national disease control, overseeing drug manufacturing quality control, and family planning programs. In addition, it plans national health policy. It also sets the regulatory structure and supports its states.

II. The 2015 National Health Policy

A. It recommends making health a basic right to every Indian citizen

B. It considers the role of the government as crucial to the success of this policy

1) It clarifies, fortifies, and prioritizes the government’s role in determining the health system

III. Government and health financing

A. The government of India spent a total of 4.02% of its GDP on health expenditures in 2013-2014 (Ghupta and Bhatia, n.d.).

B. The total government outlay totaled to 1.5% of its GDP, a rate below the typical expenditure of low-income countries (Ghupta and Bhatia, n.d.).

IV. Publicly sponsored health insurance

A. The tax-financed public system facilitates all citizens to access government health services. However, congestion forces them to seek private care, causing them to dig deeper into their pockets

B. The Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY) of 2008 headed by the Ministry of Labor and Employment provides health insurance cover to families living below the poverty line.

1) Between 2015 and 2016, 41.3 million families signed up, with the government realizing 57 percent of the mark (Ghupta and Bhatia, n.d.).

2) To increase coverage, the scheme has included 11 additional groups of unstructured employees

C. The Employees State Insurance Scheme is a health coverage system for factory workers

1) It is the only real social health insurance scheme that allows both employers and their workers to contribute

D. The Central Government Health Scheme is for government employees

1) Other groups of civil workers have their own schemes

2) Even so, only below 20 percent of Indians enjoy governmental health cover and only 8 percent of government spending goes to health

V. Private health insurance

A. Most of these are expensive and made at the point of service and may include the cost- sharing policy

1) Private insurance covers for both outpatient and inpatient services

2) Tax incentives such as exemptions on insurance premiums still do not increase affordability

VI. Delivery system organization

A. It includes a complex structure of public and private health providers

1) Primary, secondary and tertiary facilities make up the government health structure. Primary health units are the basic points of contact. It takes care of maternal and child welfare, community health, and disease control.

2) Staff shortage and the lack of equipment are a challenge in the primary health structure, with at least one health care worker is assigned to a sub-center, serving up to 30,000 people (Chokshi et al., 2016).

B. The private sector is not well regulated but offers quality services compared to public health services.

1) They are better equipped with enough health care workers

VII. The high costs leave 63percent of India’s poor languishing from high health costs

References

Chokshi, M., Patil, B., Khanna, R., Neogi, S. B., Sharma, J., Paul, V. K., & Zodpey, S. (2016). Health systems in India. Journal of perinatology : official journal of the California Perinatal Association, 36(s3), S9–S12. doi:10.1038/jp.2016.184

Gupta, I., & Bhatia, M. (n.d.). The Indian Health Care System. The Commonwealth Fund. Retrieved from https://international.commonwealthfund.org/countries/india/

 

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